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Extractive Industries

The demand for raw materials in the world keeps growing. The downsides to this development are human rights abuses and damage to the environment.


Dirty Profits 6 - Mining and Extractive Companies: promises and progress

Publication

Dirty Profits 6 report released by Facing Finance highlights the investments of ten European banks in ten transnational extractive companies like for example Glencore, Vale, Rio Tinto and others, variously which continually violate human rights and the environment. Violations cover contamination of land, water and air; silencing community activists using violence, threats and intimidation; labour violations and forced labour; and failure to provide the remedy communities deserve.  The Dirty Profits 6 report shows that the ten selected European banks alone provided capital of over €100 billion to these 10 extractive companies between 2010 and 2017. Most banks, particularly those that made the most capital available, are not taking strong enough action to ensure that mining and extractive companies respect human rights and environmental concerns. The authors of the report expect banks to take responsibility for human rights and environmental concerns in their decision making, e.g. by improving transparency and making public all relevant information related to engagement and by taking a proactive approach to identifying non-compliant companies.

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German Investments in South Africa's Coal Industry

In Southafrica,  people living next to cole mines or coal-fired power stations lose their land, their health and the access to water. As suppliers of components for the giant power stations Kusile and Medupi, German companies like SIEMENS, Bilfinger Berger or Rheinmetall Defense Electronics bear a responsibility for those problems in the coal sector of South Africa.

For more details see the MISEREOR-study “Nur die Kohle zählt" (PDF)
and www.misereor.de/kohle


When only the coal counts

Study

German co-responsibility for human rights in the South African coal sector.

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Coltan: Conflict minerals in Congo

Fungamwaka - a mine in the east of Congo. These men work so that we can make telephone calls. They are mining coltan, which is indispensable for the production of mobile phones. The Democratic Republic of Congo is the world’s second-largest supplier of this rare mineral.


The Global Energy Sector and Human Rights

Publication

Putting German Business and Policy to the Test

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Mine working in Canada

Publication

An open letter to the Prime Minister of Canada.

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Deep Seabed Mining

Study

Treasure chest or another Pandora's box? In focus: the Pacific. Published 2016.

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Overcoming Energy Poverty in the Long Run

Fact Sheet

 No development funding for coal power! A common Factsheet of Bread for the World and MISEREOR.

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Human Rights Impact Assessment on the Tampakan Copper-Gold Project

Study

The Zug-based group Glencore-Xstrata is showing insufficient respect for the rights of the affected population with its plans to exploit one of the world’s biggest open-pit mines in the Philippines. Because the project threatens the livelihood of tens of thousands of people, tensions are rising and the first deaths have occurred. That is shown by a study commissioned by the Swiss Lenten Fund, MISEREOR and Bread for All.

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Extractive Industries (Mining and Hydrocarbons), the issue of non-renewable natural resources in Latin America and the Mission of the Church

Publication

Concluding document: International Conference of CELAM and MISEREOR, Lima, July 14-16, 2011

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